Don't procrastinate - it's time to vaccinate

SPRING is here and losses due to the clostridial diseases pulpy kidney, blackleg and black disease become a definite possibility.

Don't procrastinate - it's time to vaccinate Don't procrastinate - it's time to vaccinate Don't procrastinate - it's time to vaccinate Don't procrastinate - it's time to vaccinate Don't procrastinate - it's time to vaccinate

Lambs can be given a boost against clostridial diseases by vaccinating pregnant ewes. Picture Mark Saunders.

Prevention is the key, according to Dr Jeff Cave, District Veterinary Officer with Agriculture Victoria.

"The key to prevention is to ensure that cattle and sheep are adequately protected through vaccination," Dr Cave said, in the latest Agriculture Victoria newsletter.

"Little can be done to treat an animal affected by these clostridial diseases. Often all that is found is an animal dead in the paddock. To be effective, vaccines need to be given strategically."

Most vaccines give up to 12 months of protection and should therefore be given at least annually. As with any vaccination program, adult cows and ewes should be vaccinated approximately one month prior to calving and lambing to give their calves and lambs ‘maternal' or ‘passive' immunity th...