A feverish problem on the rise

During each of the past two years, there have been more reported cases of Q Fever in Australia than during any other year in the past decade. The disease typically infects people who work closely with livestock, but anyone who frequents areas where animals congregate can be at risk. Q Fever is highly infectious and can develop into a chronic condition with long-term health implications.

A feverish problem on the rise A feverish problem on the rise A feverish problem on the rise A feverish problem on the rise A feverish problem on the rise

Q Fever was first detected in humans in Australia in the 1930s, and was called Query Fever because its cause was unknown.

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